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Hobson Prior awarded for European Supplier Excellence 2019 from AgileOne

(London, UK), September 19th, 2019 – Specialist life science recruitment company, Hobson Prior is proud to announce that on 19 September, 2019, we received AgileOne’s UK Platinum Award for European Supplier Excellence 2019. The award was presented to David Chipp and Calum Watson during an award ceremony that took place during the AgileOne Supplier Excellence Awards held in London, England.  All the winners at the AgileOne Supplier Exvellence event “With each candidate interaction and each successful placement, our suppliers play a critical role in our success at AgileOne. We are constantly evaluating our suppliers to ensure they are providing the best possible service to our clients. The Supplier Excellence Awards allow us to recognize the suppliers that consistently exceed expectations,” Brian Clark, Senior Vice President Global Operations of AgileOne. “As a trusted partner, Hobson Prior has risen to the challenge of delivering world-class customer service and high-quality talent for AgileOne’s clients around the world.” “The entire Global Strategic Sourcing team is dedicated to building strong partnerships with suppliers around the world. The Supplier Excellence Awards are just one of the many ways AgileOne seeks to showcase our ‘Best of the Best’ suppliers,” said Jaideep Majumdar, Associate Vice President of AgileOne “Our supplier partnership program strives to connect, build, foster, and grow our supplier partners so that they curate innovative, technology-based workforce solutions to better serve our clients. From sharing world-class processes to giving suppliers the opportunity to grow their business, our ‘Best of the Best’ suppliers serve as an example of what can be done when you create win-win partnerships that benefits everyone.” Calum Watson accepting the Platinum award on behalf of Hobson Prior "We are honoured to have been recognised by AgileOne. Collaboration is key to providing innovative and effective life sciences recruitment solutions and we take great pride in working with AgileOne to provide an exceptional service,” commented Managing Director of Hobson Prior, Patrick Forster. “A crucial part of Hobson Prior’s mission is to develop and build recruitment partnerships, so we can help our clients find the specialist candidates they need to make an impactful difference to patients around the world. We hope to continue developing our partnership with AgileOne as a go-to solution for life sciences recruitment.” Hobson Prior managers David Chipp and Calum Watson accepting the Agile One award About Hobson Prior Hobson Prior is a leading specialist life sciences recruiter focused on finding and placing exceptional candidates across the global life sciences industry. Our highly selective clients trust us to source and secure the best contract and permanent candidates to contribute to their success.We’ve been recruiting exceptional life science professionals since 2002 and our team of consultants, many of who used to work within the industry themselves, have been delivering tailored and successful recruitment solutions. About AgileOne From cutting-edge technologies to award-winning services, AgileOne has the resources to provide true total talent management. Good vendors can provide cost savings, risk mitigation, vendor management, and talent acquisition; but a great partner supports your business goals and navigates the legislation, regulations, and trends that will shape the future. Go beyond traditional workforce programs with a single consultative partner that understands where you want to go, and how you can get there. Minority/woman-owned, with operations in 32 countries around the globe. One World. One Workforce. One provider: AgileOne.

How bad hires happen

Making a bad hire is not just frustrating – it’s also very expensive. It’s far more costly than leaving a position open, according to 73% of hiring decision makers[1]. Whatever the new hire’s shortcomings are, their cost to the business can quickly stack up: Salary. If your new hire isn’t doing their job properly – whether due to inability or unwillingness – you’ll be paying a salary for no return. Reduced productivity. A bad hire will reduce productivity in their team, by slowing processes, failing to deliver information and taking up their supervisor’s time. Frustration with a bad hire can also demotivate employees; 35% of hiring managers believe that bad hires greatly affect team morale[2]. By reducing productivity across the team, a bad hire can significantly impact operating profit and/or sales. Even if you replace them, it can take time and effort to repair the damage. Replacement. Having to replace a bad employee doubles the time and money you spend on hiring for the role. Furthermore, you will have to repeat the on-boarding process, which can be a drain on other employees’ time too. Why do bad hires happen? Despite the damaging consequences of making a bad hire, it’s a mistake made all too often; a staggering 80% of employee turnover is due to bad hiring decisions[3]. But how do so many unsuitable candidates get past the radar? It usually happens when important details are overlooked or ignored, due to: 1. Lack of hiring experience Assessing a CV is the tip of the iceberg when it comes to hiring; in order to really understand the candidate you need exceptional interviewing skills, a highly critical eye and the ability to grasp their true motives. Unfortunately, inexperienced hirers tend to be taken in by candidates that look good on paper. 2. Misjudging character It’s easy to think a candidate is a good fit because they seem nice and got on well with you in the interview. In fact, identifying someone who will thrive in your company’s environment is about much more. You need to ensure that their values, motives and working style are aligned to that of your company. 3. Trying to save costs You might choose someone because their salary expectations are low, or because you found them yourself and don’t have to pay agency fees. But comprising on quality to save costs is far more expensive in the long run, due to the negative impacts a bad hire can have on productivity and the expense of replacing them. 4. Desperation Maybe your company needs someone urgently; maybe you’ve found a seemingly great candidate and you’re worried they’ll take another job. Either way, a snap-decision is risky. If it transpires that they’re the wrong person for the job, you’ll not only have wasted time on them, but lost any other candidates involved in the interviewing process. How can recruiters help you avoid a bad hire? Using a recruiter isn’t always necessary, but their skills and connections can be invaluable when: A long wait would impact on-going projects or deadlines The skillsets required for the role are rare or in high demand You’re making a high-level appointment (meaning a bad hire would be particularly costly) You’re making a client-facing appointment (meaning a bad hire would be particularly damaging) A good recruitment consultancy will ensure you get the right person first time, saving you from the costs and damages a bad hire can incur. At Hobson Prior we achieve this by making use of our: 1. Candidate management skills When you’re juggling interviews on top of your usual duties, you don’t have time to manage candidates between stages in the hiring process. Candidates may drop out during these gaps, and it’s this risk that can lead employers to make snap-decision hires. Recruiters will manage candidates during these periods: answering questions, addressing concerns and providing reassurance. This enables you to carry out a thorough hiring process, without losing candidates along the way. Our consultants also support candidates throughout their probation period, to ensure a successful transition. Being a third party is a real advantage: candidates feel more comfortable expressing any concerns to us, and we have the experience to advise and reassure them. 2. Mind-reading powers Ok, we’re not actually telepathic. But we are skilled at getting to the core of a candidate’s motives. We develop long-term relationships with our candidates, so we get to know their aspirations and behaviours very well. We question candidates deeply about their fit for the role before putting them forward for an interview, in order to filter out time-wasters and window-shoppers. It can be uncomfortable for a client to challenge a candidate’s reasons for wanting the job, and intense questioning could put the individual off. Recruiters, as a third party, can ensure the candidate is thoroughly vetted whilst protecting the relationship between employer and candidate. 3. Pre-existing candidate pools You don’t need to compromise on quality when faced with an urgent vacancy. Good recruiters are able to source high-quality, vetted candidates in a short space of time; and they can provide contractors almost immediately to plug any short-term gaps. At Hobson Prior, we’re able to do this due to our proactive headhunting methods. Our consultants continually build and nurture talent pools of skilled individuals who aren’t actively looking for a new job; so when a role comes up, they can immediately match it to well-suited individuals. Cost effective With fees ranging from 20-35% of the candidate’s salary, using a recruitment consultancy can seem like the expensive option. However, a specialist consultancy will help significantly reduce the risk of a bad hire, thereby protecting you from the associated costs. Ultimately, using high-quality recruiters to ensure you get the right candidate first time can be the most cost effective solution. This was a lesson one of our clients learnt, when they came to us after a particularly disheartening case of bad hiring – read the case study to see how we helped them recover. We can secure high quality candidates who’ll make a real difference to your business, so why not contact Hobson Prior to discuss your company’s future staffing requirements. [1] Career Builder Communications, 2015 [2] Robert Half, 2014 [3] Harvard Business Review

How to network strategically at conferences

Attending conferences is one of the best ways to network within your industry. In fact, 85% of professionals say they build stronger, more meaningful business relationships at conferences than through other forms of networking[1] Nevertheless, networking at an event with hundreds or thousands of people in attendance can be a daunting challenge. Without a strategy, you can easily miss good opportunities, get stuck talking to the wrong people or simply become overwhelmed. So we’ve gathered our best tips in this article to help you take an effective, targeted approach to networking. Before the conference The more you prepare before a conference, the more you’re likely to get out of it. This doesn’t just mean stocking up on business cards – you need to arm yourself with knowledge. Not only will this make networking easier and more productive, it will also increase your confidence. Do your homework by following these steps: Set some  goals. What do you want out of networking? This might be new clients, a job offer or a business partner, or you may simply want to develop your industry connections. Your goals should influence which sessions you attend and who you approach. Research speakers, attendees and exhibitors. Make a shortlist of those you’d like to meet. If you can, ask to meet up for a coffee at the conference; mention something specific you’d like to discuss, such as a project they’ve worked on, as this will make your interest seem genuine.  Create a schedule. Map out which sessions you want to attend so you don’t miss anything important. Remember to spend time in the break-out areas and exhibition hall, as this is a good place to network.  Practise introducing yourself. Keep it concise (about 30 seconds). Consider mentioning a key project you’ve worked on, as this will give them something to ask questions about.  On the day Lots of people suffer from networking nerves, but just remember that everyone is there to meet new people, and most will be more than happy to chat with you. To optimise your success, keep your goals in mind and follow these steps: Warm up. Before you approach people on your speak-to list, give yourself a practice run. Strike up a conversation with the first person you sit next to, asking open-ended questions such as ‘how did you get into your field?’ or ‘which sessions are you planning to attend?’. Take notes on people. When you’ve finished talking to someone, jot down some key points from your conversation as this will help you when following up after the conference. Think about what you can offer. Research shows that networking can make people feel ‘dirty’[2] Don’t discount people at lower levels. These people often have up-to-date knowledge of innovation and thinking in their field, and they may provide a good introduction to senior people within their organisation. Know how to excuse yourself gracefully. Whether you get stuck in an overly long conversation, or you’re talking to someone you don’t want to connect with, remember that it’s ok to excuse yourself. Explain that you want to circulate more, thank them for their time and move on. Follow up To turn promising contacts into valuable additions to your professional network, it’s crucial that you follow them up shortly after the conference. Keep the ball rolling by following these steps: Send emails within 1-2 days. While you’re still fresh in their minds, drop a short email to contacts to say how much you enjoyed meeting them. Remind them what you spoke about, and if possible send a relevant article to reinforce your interest in the subject. Add them as a connection on LinkedIn. Don’t forget to send a personalised message with your request, reminding them how you met. Offer to introduce them to people. You’ll be demonstrating your value if you can introduce them to other relevant connections. Suggest a catch-up over coffee. Emails, calls and social media have their place, but nothing can replace a meeting in person – in fact, 95% of professionals say face-to-face meetings are essential for long-term business relationships.[1] Networking at conferences takes a big investment of time, money and effort. Nevertheless, you’ll get out what you put in. If you keep your goals in mind, while at the same time valuing and enjoying the company of like-minded professionals, you’ll establish an exceptional business network. We’re going to being attending a number of upcoming life science conferences, including the DIA EuroMeeting in Hamburg and the ARCS Scientific Congress in Sydney. Why not meet up with us to discuss our latest job opportunities, or your company’s staffing needs? Find out more on our Events page.   [1] greatbusinessschools.org [2] The Contaminating Effects of Building Instrumental Ties: How Networking Can Make Us Feel Dirty, Administrative Science Quarterly December 2014

Biotechs: should you bring your regulatory work in-house?

Outsourcing regulatory affairs work is common among small to medium biotechnology companies, but it’s often for want of a better option. The majority of these businesses are forced down the outsourcing route – even when it does not deliver the desired results or cost-effectiveness – because they struggle to find the right RA candidates to bring in-house. Due to their complexity, RA roles requiring experience with biological products are not fully understood by many recruiters. Indeed, this is a fault we recognised in ourselves a few years ago – and the discovery led to the establishment of our Biotech Team. Having developed specialist knowledge of the biotech arena – and an extensive network of regulatory professionals working on large molecule products – our consultants are now helping biotechs across the UK to recruit in-house. So, given the option, should you move your regulatory work in-house? Unfortunately, there’s no easy, one-size-fits-all answer. The best solution depends on your company’s size, location, product portfolio and core strengths, as well as the extent and expertise of the support you require. To help you discover the best solution, we’ve explored some of the pros and cons below. Outsourcing The benefits of outsourcing regulatory work can include access to a variety of expertise, flexible costs and increased internal focus on your business’ core strengths. However, it’s important to weigh up the benefits of outsourcing against the associated costs and risks. In the regulatory environment, the potential issues and complications of outsourcing can include: Data security System access Managing third party performance Changes in staff within the outsourcing company Loss of control Increased compliance risk Impact on internal employees, internal change management Disputes / confusion around shared internal responsibility Internal process codification Unsustainable savings, renegotiating contracts In-house Hiring in-house regulatory professionals is not always a feasible solution, particularly for early-stage businesses and those with inconstant regulatory work. Yet many businesses realise significant benefit from bringing their regulatory support in-house: Full control and oversight Greater influence over performance, prioritisation and time-management Dedicated support (unlike an outsourced supplier, which will have other clients) No extra charges if a project runs for longer than expected You know exactly who’s doing your work and who you’re paying for (unlike with an outsourced supplier, who may use senior staff to win the contract but put junior staff on your account team) Employees tend to have greater commitment to your organisation’s objectives Better interdepartmental communication, due to proximity and shared company culture In-house support is an investment that will help future-proof Case study: Why ReNeuron keeps their regulatory work in-house Our client, ReNeuron, is a leading, clinical-stage stem cell business based in Wales. Below, the company’s Head of Regulatory Affairs explains why he chooses to hire regulatory professionals in-house, rather than outsourcing the team’s work. “As a small biotech company working in the stem cell space, outsourcing of certain activities can make good business sense. However, as we grapple with the complexities of our development programmes, the close interactions required between functions on a day-to-day basis means that on-site staff play a key role in achieving our objectives. A mix of permanent and contract staff give us their dedicated support; they develop a sense of ownership and collegiate working, which is essential to our progress. In-house staff allow us to control our budget and monitor priorities and objectives continuously. They have greater involvement and a less task-orientated approach than in an outsourced context, allowing us to benefit from new ideas, insights and ways of working.” Shaun Stapleton, ReNeuron If you’re still not sure, or want to explore your options further, why not get in touch with one of our regulatory professionals.

How to make your CV stand out in the life sciences

Your CV is often the first impression a hiring manager has of your professional career. It is important that it reflects your experience to demonstrate what you would bring to a specialist life sciences position. Mastering the art of writing a CV can be difficult enough, but how can exceptional candidates like you make your profile stand out when applying for a role? Hobson Prior recruiters are specialised within the life sciences and see thousands of CVs from professionals with varying experience across pharmaceuticals, biotechnology and medical devices. We know what hiring managers are looking for, so we’ve collated 10 of our top CV writing tips to help you secure an exciting new job where you can thrive. Our top 10 life sciences CV writing tips Start with a summary With hundreds of CVs on their desks, having a short, impactful summary is a great way to grab their attention immediately. Bullet point your successes, qualifications and experiences. You can explain in more detail further down. Proofread Even if you’ve read it 40 times, read it again and get someone else to take a look. If you’re working with a recruiter, ask them to check it too. You want to present your best foot forward and demonstrate your attention to detail. Keep formatting simple Creative CVs are a unique and memorable way to stand out amongst the crowd, but they are risky. Multiple fonts, text sizes and sporadic use of CAPITAL LETTERS, bold and other formatting make your CV stand out for the wrong reasons. Stick to two pages It can be tempting to include as much detail as possible in your CV to prove why you are a must-have hire. However, hiring managers do not want to read an essay about your career, especially when they have a pile of other CVs to get through. Focus on results Your resumé should demonstrate how your actions led to positive outcomes; that’s what makes you stand out as an efficient and desirable candidate. Including figures and statistics immediately shows a hiring manager the impact you will bring their company. Promote yourself This is your opportunity to let potential hiring managers see that you are a skilled, educated and driven candidate. Many job seekers find it uncomfortable talking about themselves, but that’s the job of a CV. Avoid arrogance or lying, but don’t be afraid to highlight your wins. Ask a recruiter It is always useful to get a second opinion on your CV, especially from specialists. Recruiters help job seekers find great roles every day. They know what hiring managers are looking for and can give you advice on how best to optimise your CV. Plus, once updated, they can make sure hiring managers see your CV. Send us your CV Target your CV Whilst it is logical to list all your previous jobs, it is key your CV focuses on the role you are applying to. Including the fact you used to work at a café isn’t a negative, but be sure to prioritise relevant experience. Get your CV seen  The CV is usually the first round of the job stage process so it important that it gets in front of the right people. The best way to improve your chances of having your CV seen by the hiring managers at pharmaceutical, medical devices and biotechnology companies is to share it with specialists recruiters.  Hobson Prior recruiters work exclusively within the life sciences sector. We partner with upcoming and industry-leading companies to find them top talent like you. By sharing your CV with us, you'll get advice from life sciences recruitment specialists as well as the latest job opportunities from our clients. .find-recruiter, .snip-button-container { justify-content: left; }

How to impress in a job interview for life sciences

Most job interviews will involve competency-based questions. Interviewers will often have pre-determined criteria they are looking out for in your answers to assess your knowledge, skills, attitude and experience. This is a great way for you to highlight how you work with others, your understanding of your limitations, how you deal with pressure and other quality traits that aren’t necessarily easy to show in your CV. They may ask you something along the lines of: “Tell me about a time when you overcame a problem” or “Tell me about a time you showed leadership”.   The STAR method One of the best ways to answer these questions is with the STAR method, which stands for: Situation Task Action Result Situation Give a brief overview of the circumstances. What was the project you were working on? Who were you working with? When and where did it happen? Keep this concise. You’re aiming to provide context, rather than relay every detail. Task This is when you talk about the specifics of your role in the situation. What was your responsibility? What did you need to achieve? What were the challenges? Remember, the interviewer is looking out for signs of your knowledge, skills and attitude. Action This should be a detailed explanation of how you approached and completed the task. How did you assess the situation? What did you do and how did you do it? How did you work with others? You should dedicate more time to your action than the overviews of the situation and task – this is where you get to display your positive traits to the interviewer. Result This is when you promote the impacts your actions had. It should be positive and quantifiable. The more detail you can provide on the results, the better. Don’t just say you did a good job, show how that good job actually impacted the situation. E.g. “I exceeded my target by 20%” This is key information the interviewer is looking for, so it’s important not to overlook it.   Our six interview tips Interviews can be stressful, but not if you prepare effectively. They are also a great time for you to get more understanding of the team you’ll be joining and the role you are applying for. Plus, it’s always good practice for learning how best to present yourself as you progress through your career. Here’s our 6 best pieces advice for impressing during an interview. Do your research Look into the company and what they’ve been working on. Demonstrating you’ve researched their ethos and business shows your dedication to the opportunity. Dress appropriately It seems common sense, but dress in smart, professional clothing. If your interview is over video, be sure to dress as you would for a face-to-face interview. Don’t be afraid to pause It’s easy to lose your train of thought. Take a pause before answering a question and speak slowly and purposefully. Your interviewer would rather you collect your thoughts than ramble. Prepare some examples Think about your past experiences that highlight your knowledge, skills and attitude positively and make notes on how you would explain them. Have stories you can rely upon during the interview. Smile and be yourself It seems simple, but make sure you smile. Interviewers are looking for someone who will fit the company culture. Smile and show them that you’re someone they’d love to work with. Ask your own questions Interviews aren’t interrogations; you’re both seeing if you would suit the role. When prompted, ask questions about the job and the company, so you feel comfortable about pursuing the opportunity.    Preparation is key Your Hobson Prior recruiter will run through what to expect from the interview to help you prepare your travel, what to prepare and the key areas to focus on as part of your recruitment journey with us.  If you are concerned about an upcoming interview or would like to learn more about life sciences career opportunities, contact our recruitment team here.   Get your CV seen  Before you get to the interview stage, it is important that your CV gets in front of the right people. The best way to improve your chances of having your CV seen by the hiring managers at pharmaceutical, medical devices and biotechnology companies is to share it with specialists recruiters.  Hobson Prior recruiters work exclusively within the life sciences sector. We partner with upcoming and industry-leading companies to find them top talent like you. By sharing your CV with us, you'll get advice from life sciences recruitment specialists as well as the latest job opportunities from our clients.

Hobson Prior Honoured as Top Supplier by KellyOCG®

Hobson Prior was honoured to receive a Supplier Excellence Award KellyOCG®, the outsourcing and consulting group of Kelly, in Amsterdam. The award is presented to top-performing national and global suppliers that provide superior workforce solutions, and whose service, results and strategic partnerships have made a significant impact on KellyOCG's business. "We are honoured to present Hobson Prior with this award for their outstanding efforts to provide diverse delivery models and capabilities." Thorsten Koletschka, VP and Global Lead Supplier Strategy & Engagement, Global Professional Services Organization for KellyOCG.  Suppliers are evaluated on three criteria scorecard results of their performance within KellyOCG-managed programs; compliance with legal and program-specific requirements; and engagement survey results from KellyOCG stakeholders assessing the ease of doing business with the supplier and the supplier’s partnership approach. Out of thousands, Hobson Prior was recognized by Kelly OCG as one of its 19 top suppliers from Europe, the United States and Asia Pacific. “We are honoured to present Hobson Prior with this award for their outstanding efforts to provide diverse delivery models and capabilities. Our partnership with our suppliers are key to supporting our global customers as help them determine what’s next for their workforce planning and talent needs,” said Thorsten Koletschka, VP and Global Lead Supplier Strategy & Engagement, Global Professional Services Organization for KellyOCG. Patrick Forster (Operations DIrector) and Michael Masoomi (Team Leader for Biometrics Recruitment) collecting the KellyOCG Supplier Excellence Award in Amsterdam “Hobson Prior has always valued its commitment to developing recruitment partnerships and we are proud and thrilled to accept this award from KellyOCG. We aim to go above and beyond traditional recruitment companies to provide exceptional life sciences recruitment services to our clients. We hope to continue developing our partnership with KellyOCG as a go-to solution for their hiring needs,” commented Patrick Forster, Head of Operations at Hobson Prior. Award-winning organizations receive one-on-one development sessions; a designated KellyOCG representative to support their business growth; participation in supplier focus groups; access to KellyOCG’s supplier insight; and the ability to work directly with KellyOCG senior leaders. About Hobson Prior Hobson Prior is a leading specialist life sciences recruiter, focused on finding and placing exceptional candidates across the global life sciences industry. Our highly selective clients trust us to source and secure the best contract and permanent candidates to contribute to their success. We’ve been recruiting exceptional life science professionals since 2002 and our team of consultants, many of who used to work within the industry themselves, have been delivering tailored and successful recruitment solutions. About KellyOCG KellyOCG is the leading global advisor of talent supply chain strategies and workforce solutions. We align talent strategy to business goals to define what’s next for the future of work, enabling our clients to ditch the script on the old way of thinking. Through our vertical expertise and trusted advisor status with our clients, we make meaningful connections between talent and organizations, advancing careers and business goals. Visit www.kellyocg.com.

How Brexit is impacting the life sciences industry

Brexit’s impact on the life sciences industry The UK accounts for around 25% of the EU market so will remain a key contributor to the European life sciences market, however, Brexit will undoubtedly lead to some changes, most notably with the European Medicines Agency relocating from London to Amsterdam. If the UK remains part of the European Economic Area (EEA), it would continue to trade with the EU with minimal impact to border checks. A hard Brexit will lead to more significant changes as the UK and EU will need to negotiate on the terms of their relationship and how this will impact regulation, the free movement of workers and the trade of medicines and medical devices. Although the UK would be the first country to leave the EU, it is not the only European country that operates outside of the EU. Countries like Norway, Iceland and the life sciences powerhouse Switzerland are not members of the EU and have formed agreements with EU nations through the EEA, EMA and EFTA. The largest impact to the life sciences industry would occur if the UK were to leave the EU without an agreed deal. Most life sciences companies are making sure they have a “No Deal” back up plan to ensure they can continue the supply and distribution of medicines and medical devices to patients across Europe. Key areas that may be impacted most include: Career opportunities and hiring Trade and distribution Regulation and the EMA relocation Clinical trials and funding   Career opportunities and hiring There are mixed signals regarding the effect of Brexit on career opportunities. Some large life sciences company headquarters are moving from the UK to the EU and some positions require workers to be based in a specific country. For example, the Qualified Person Responsible for Pharmacovigilance (QPPV) for the EU regulations needs to be based in the EU, meaning a UK based EU-QPPV would need to relocate or be replaced. “Brexit has been a double-edged sword for career opportunities. The greater administration and duplication for EU and UK equivalents has created more jobs in the build-up of Brexit. However, it has also forced many to question relocation and their job security.” Callum Mansfield, Associate Director at Hobson Prior Both the EU and UK have agreed to safeguard the rights of EU citizens living in the UK and UK citizens living in the EU. EU citizens and their families that have lived in the UK for at least five years before the end of the transition period will be able to apply for “settled status”, which will give them the right to remain and work in their country of residence indefinitely. This has been replicated for UK citizens living in the EU. Whilst this has been a reassurance to many life science professionals living across Europe, there are concerns this will reduce the appeal of working internationally.   Trade and distribution The EU operates as a single market keeping trade across the EU open. If the UK remains part of the EEA, it will maintain most of the existing system, minimising the impact of Brexit. If the UK does not join the EEA, it will need to negotiate sector-specific trade agreements with the EU’s single market. “Patient access to medicines and medical devices is a key concern. Some life sciences companies have stockpiled these products to avoid supply issues from potential customs and border checks.” Calum Watson, recruitment manager at Hobson Prior   Regulation and the EMA relocation Regulations on quality assurance and the process of obtaining marketing authorisation depend heavily on the relationship the UK maintains with the EEA. The UK will still be able to apply for authorisation in the EU, in the same way as non-European countries. This process may lead to additional checks and costs. The European Medicines Agency (EMA) is currently based in London, UK, but it is anticipated to relocate to the EU. As part of the EEA, the UK could still apply for market authorisation through a centralised route. If the UK leaves the EEA, they will need to produce multiple national applications, depending on the deal that is agreed with the EU. “The EMA relocation has already required workers to either move to Amsterdam or find alternative employment. Much is still to be decided in terms of medicines and medical devices regulations. Although the EMA and MHRA are continuing to collaborate over the transition period, we’ve already seen the EMA award the MHRA fewer contracts during this uncertain time.” Raymond Pankhurst, regulatory affairs recruiter at Hobson Prior   Clinical trials and funding On leaving the EU, UK pharmaceutical companies would no longer have automatic access to funding from EU research and innovation schemes. The UK may be able to negotiate their inclusion and access to these schemes as an associated country, but this would likely require the UK to provide a financial contribution. Currently, the UK is one of the most popular locations for phase I, phase II and phase III trials. Member states may prefer to run trials within the EU to give them access to a larger market. “Where the UK is no longer being part of the EU regulatory system, it may be more costly to run separate trials for the UK. This will likely impact the UK’s appeal for clinical trials.” David Chipp, associate director at Hobson Prior   Voices from the industry To better understand how the industry is preparing for Brexit, we wanted to hear the views from those who work across the life sciences industry. We asked 1,281 candidates and clients to take part in our survey to collect a better understanding of how the attitudes, values and future plans will potentially be impacted for people in our industry. We are happy to announce the release of “Brexit’s Impact on life sciences professionals” by Hobson Prior. Focusing on career opportunities and industry impact, this report is an overview of the opinions and voices of those working within the industry and how they anticipate Brexit to affect their jobs, mobility and opportunities. Unsure how Brexit will impact hiring trends in life sciences? As a leading life sciences recruitment consultancy, Hobson Prior is committed to connecting the best candidates to the projects and jobs that need them. Our unique and focused approach has enabled us to develop long-term, trust-based relationships with our candidates and clients. If you’d like to discuss the report, your company’s staffing requirements or your personal career opportunities with us, please do not hesitate to get in touch with our recruitment experts.

Brexits impact on life sciences professionals

Brexit and the life sciences industry As the United Kingdom approaches the agreed deadline for their departure from the European Union, there is still much uncertainty surrounding Brexit and how it will affect the life sciences industry. The European Medicine’s Agency has officially begun operating from Amsterdam, after leaving its London office on 1st March. Many pharmaceutical companies have stockpiled medicines, anticipating delays and bottlenecks in customs when Brexit comes into effect. The industry has worked hard to ensure patient access to healthcare is minimally impacted, regardless of the type of deal the UK and EU decide. Voices from the industry To better understand how the industry is preparing for Brexit, we wanted to hear the views from those who work across the life sciences industry. We asked 1,281 candidates and clients to take part in our survey to collect a better understanding of how the attitudes, values and future plans will potentially be impacted for people in our industry. We are happy to announce the release of “Brexit’s Impact on life sciences professionals” by Hobson Prior. Focusing on career opportunities and industry impact, this report is an overview of the opinions and voices of those working within the industry and how they anticipate Brexit to affect their jobs, mobility and opportunities.     Here are some key highlights from the report: 72% of life sciences professional based in the UK anticipate Brexit will have a negative impact on their sector 62% of life sciences professional based in the EU see no impact on their career opportunities 63% EU-based life sciences professionals would be unlikely to consider work in the UK after Brexit In this report, we also captured some of the opinions of those working within the life sciences industry to highlight some of the neutral, negative and positive responses to the developments of Brexit and the life sciences.  “I will have to compete with people already have the freedom to work and live in the EU. I cannot see why hiring managers will make more work for themselves.” EU-based specialist senior programmer “I think this industry will have plenty of opportunity for growth once the uncertainty settles and we are set on a fixed path.” UK-based clinical safety manager About the survey Understanding the developments within our industry and the motivations of our candidates and clients is crucial to our success as life sciences recruiters. This quest for knowledge is the motivation behind this Brexit study. As a leading life sciences recruitment consultancy, Hobson Prior is committed to connecting the best candidates to the projects and jobs that need them. Our unique and focused approach has enabled us to develop long-term, trust-based relationships with our candidates and clients. If you’d like to discuss the report, your company’s staffing requirements or your personal career opportunities with us, please do not hesitate to get in touch with our recruitment experts.

The demand for work life balance in quality assurance jobs

Work-life balance is a core value for many of us and its recognition amongst employers is increasing. Silicon Valley figureheads, such as Google and Intel, have implemented various wellbeing schemes and allowances to keep their staff happy and healthy. Whilst some industries have been fast to adopt, the pharmaceutical industry has been slower to offer flexibility. A recent study conducted by the global unified communications company, Fuze, 95% of workers say work-life balance is an important factor when searching for a new job. Similarly, a report from Virgin highlighted that 76% of workers don’t work as remotely as they’d like. With life sciences job seekers looking for more flexibility and pharmaceutical companies aiming to attract and retain talent, is flexible working in quality assurance jobs possible? Hobson Prior’s lead quality assurance recruiter, Steven Fuller, shares 5 core insights into how the quality assurance job market is being impacted by the increasing demand for flexible working and how quality assurance job seekers can make the most of this trend. “The demand is there; I’ve seen candidates reject jobs that don’t offer flexible working hours” Modern life is demanding. The traditional 9-5 doesn’t always apply to QA roles as is, but the ability for QA professionals to balance the demands of work with the stresses of modern life, like appointments or missing their children’s bedtimes, would certainly be well received. As a lead quality assurance recruiter, Steven has seen many senior quality assurance managers and responsible quality persons reject high-paying jobs at global pharmaceutical companies. The head of quality may have parent’s evenings to attend. A QA analyst might have elderly parents to care for. Your quality assurance team leader might have to pick the car up from the garage. “Almost every other industry is offering it; why shouldn’t a quality assurance manager have the same flexi-time as their friends in finance or marketing? I’ve had candidates turn down well-paid roles at world-renowned companies because there is no flexibility offered”. “Start-ups tend to be more receptive, but the larger pharmaceutical companies are listening” It’s always harder to establish a consistent company culture in a global company: if you allow flexible hours for your offices in Cambridge, you’d be pressured to do the same for your site in Basel. Pharmaceutical start-ups are less restricted and more open to flexible working to attract top talent. That said, large pharmaceutical companies want to remain competitive to attract top talent in quality assurance positions. “When a global pharmaceutical company offers flexible working hours for a quality assurance job, the others need to adapt their offerings to be more appealing to attract the best candidates. There’s more opportunity to negotiate work life in quality assurance than you may think”. Plus, with work-life balance becoming an expectation of millennial culture, pharmaceutical companies are promoting flexible hours in quality to encourage the next generation of QA managers, heads of QA and QA auditors more. “Some quality assurance jobs offer more flexibility than others” Whilst many would appreciate the opportunity to adapt our contracted hours to suit our busy schedules, it may not be possible to offer the same work-life balance structure for all quality control and quality assurance positions. “It depends entirely on the role: a QA systems engineer may be able to access the eQMS systems from home, so working from home in QA can be an option. "Alternatively, a senior manufacturing GXP needs to be onsite where the manufacturing and distribution take place. Their company may not be able to offer working from home, but may be able to negotiate flexible hours or a shift allowance to increase work-life balance for their QA team.” Some quality jobs can be fully home-based, such as a GxP quality assurance job that focuses on eQMS and CAPAs. That said, a GCP QA manager would need to visit sites from time to time to ensure quality best practice. Travel commitments are often unavoidable in QA careers, making it difficult to secure a fully home-based role; different GXPs have different options. If flexibility is what you are looking for, a QA recruiter will have the right connections. View the latest quality assurance job opportunities “Pharma companies are being creative to offer more work-life balance” Homeworking is a popular trend across the life sciences job market, but it is not always a feasible option. Pharmaceutical companies have needed to be creative to create opportunities for their QA teams to make sure they can still tackle the demands of QA job with work-life balance. “Benefits packages, such as shift allowance offer an alternative to the traditional Monday-Friday, 9-5 that may suit some QA professionals better. Shifts allow for more control over what days in the week they work, with potential financial benefits for traditionally unsociable hours, whilst also allow QA professionals to have slightly more freedom and flexible working”. “A quality assurance recruiter can help secure flexible benefits” Flexible hours and homeworking in quality assurance are growing, but it is not always as readily available to job seekers. “As the lead quality assurance recruiter for Hobson Prior, it’s my job to understand your career requirements and make sure I connect you to roles that tick those boxes”. Just because a job doesn’t overtly offer flexible working, does not necessarily mean it cannot be included. QA recruiters build relationships with pharmaceutical hiring managers, HR and talent acquisition teams and have a unique insight into which companies offer flexible working and which are more reluctant, saving you time in your job search. “It is often the senior QA jobs that allow flexibility. A senior QP holds a great deal of responsibility and will often need to be available onsite. It can be tricky to negotiate flexible hours in QA management jobs, but it is certainly possible.” Securing a work-life balance Defining a balance between managing demands of work with family and social life is hugely for personal wellbeing. The life sciences industry is adapting to these demands and many businesses are offering new and inventive benefit packages to help keep their employees motivated and healthy. As a quality assurance recruiter, Steven has seen the rise in childcare allowance, flexi-time, shift allowance, gym lunches and working from home opportunities. These are not specific to the quality assurance job market, but we are seeing more requests from QA job seekers and an understanding from companies hiring quality assurance professionals. If flexible hours and a strong work-life balance is something you’re looking for, contact our quality assurance recruitment team who will help you find a QA job that suits your requirements. View the latest quality assurance jobs here.

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